COMPARATIVE ANATOMY
Biology 3440


Dr. Robert E. Martin Fall Semester 2001

Office: Room 105 (Science, New location) Phone: 793-3870

E-mail: martinr@mcmurryadm.mcm.edu

I. PREREQUISITES: Biology 1401 (Principles of Biology) and Biology 1403 (Zoology).

II. OBJECTIVES AND SCOPE OF COURSE

A. To provide an overview of what constitutes a chordate animal and how the different classes of chordates compare with one another.

B. To review the geologic history and evolution of the chordates by an understanding of the geologic timetable and what groups of chordates were present at different points of time.

C. To survey the tissues and organ systems of chordates in lecture and in the laboratory to show similarities and differences in structures and how these relate to functions.

D. To become familiar with anatomical terminology and points of reference by example and knowledge of word origins.

E. To become proficient in the art of dissection of representative vertebrates so that word descriptions of anatomical directions and structures provide understanding and clues to relationships.

III. TEXTBOOKS & HANDOUT MATERIALS

Textbooks:

Kent, G. C., and R. K. Carr. 2001. Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. 9th. edition. McGraw-Hill Publishers. xvii + 524 pp.

Martin, R. E. 201. Guide to Comparative Anatomy. McMurry University, v + 38 pp. [available for $3.30 at Print Shop, Old Main]

Wischnitzer, S. 1993. Atlas and dissection guide for comparative anatomy, 5th ed. W. H. Freeman and Company, New York. 284 pp.

Handout Materials:

Some handout material not included in the "Guide to Comparative Anatomy" will be provided at intervals during the semester.

IV. LABORATORY WORK

Work in the laboratory will consist of demonstrations and dissection of selected species of vertebrates. Practical tests will be given to test your understanding of the anatomy and function of organs and structures and relationships between different groups of vertebrates.

V. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Participation in dissection of specimens in the laboratory.

Clean up tools and table where you have worked on specimens in the laboratory.

Take four 150 point lecture exams (including the final exam) for a total of 600 points.
Take five laboratory exams, each worth 80 points, for a total of 400 points.

A passing grade in this course requires a minimum of 600 points. The grading scale for the course is listed below, which reflects the new ± grading schedule approved by the faculty this spring:

A = 930-1000 points A- = 900-929 points
B+ = 870-899 points B = 830-869 points B- = 800-829 points C+ = 770-799 points C = 730-769 points C- = 700-729 points
D+ = 670-699 points D = 630-669 points D- = 600-629 points
F = <600 points

VI. TESTS AND GRADING

Lecture tests will be a combination of multiple choice, short answer, matching, and discussion questions. You will receive a copy of a one-page sample of typical questions prior to the first exam.

Laboratory exams and most (see below) lecture exams are not comprehensive.

An optional comprehensive final, worth 150 points, may be taken as a replacement exam for one of the previously-taken lecture exams for which you were not satisfied with your performance.

VII. EXTRA CREDIT WORK OR ASSIGNMENTS


Extra credit may be offered for attendance at special lectures or for

special exercises in lecture and the laboratory. No more than 25 points of extra credit work is anticipated during the semester.

VIII. READING ASSIGNMENTS

All assigned material in the textbooks and the handouts given you in class. Exams will cover material (no more than 20% on a given test) from the textbook.

IX. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Attendance will be taken in both lecture and laboratory. Students are strongly encouraged to attend all lectures and laboratory sessions and there are penalties for absences, as follows: 1) you may miss material that will be covered on tests; (2) you may be dropped from the course for excessive absences. Make-up lectures or lecture notes [other than material available in study guide and handouts] will not be provided. At you request, handouts will be made available to you upon your return to class.

X. RULES OF CONDUCT IN CLASS AND LABORATORY

Students will be expected to abide by all rules of conduct established by the university.

Everyone will be treated with respect. Putdowns, horseplay, and general rudeness will not be tolerated. This has rarely been a problem at McMurry and we want to keep it that way.

Students should not receive cellular phone calls in a manner that creates an audible ring [turn the phone off or set the device to vibrate if you are expecting an important call]. Ringing phones are distracting to others and you should leave the room if you receive a call.

In the lecture room, do not carry on phone conversations or other conversations while lectures are being conducted. This rule does not preclude asking questions during lectures or to conversation before or after the formal lectures.

In the laboratory, conversation is encouraged and expected except during testing or when directions are being given by the instructor.

X. MAKE-UP WORK AND EXAMINATIONS

Make-up exams and laboratory practical exams will be given only for excused absences. A makeup exam must be taken within one week of your return to school. Unexcused absences or exams not made up for excused absences will average in as zero. Students representing the college on an official basis or due to approved field trips in other classes will be allowed to make up work and tests missed (lecture tests and practical exams).

XI. OFFICE AND OFFICE HOURS

Office: S105 (I'm in if light is on and door is open; come on in. The "office" part of the room is in the NE corner of the lab.).

Office Hours: Regular office hours are posted on my door.

Please make an appointment for other times. However, feel free to talk with me as a "drop-in" if the matter is an emergency and can't wait for the regularly-scheduled office hours.

XII. REVIEW OF MATERIAL IN LABORATORY

Students are encouraged to review material in the laboratory at times other than the regularly scheduled lab. Generally, this review must be done between 8:30-5:00 p.m. when I am in the department. If another class is using the room get permission from the laboratory instructor to see if you can use the room concurrently with that laboratory class.