DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Professors Martin, Pilcher, Schofield

Associate Professors Benoit, McCoun, Veltkamp, Chairperson

Assistant Professor Cornelius

Mission and Goals:

This department offers an interdisciplinary major for students interested in a career or postgraduate study in the environmental field. The Department of Environmental Science believes its mission to be:

  1. To provide students with a multidisciplinary background in science, mathematics, business, and communication. Students will take classes in these areas to develop technical and interpersonal skills useful in environmental science inquiry and decision making.
  2. To stimulate the development of quantitative skills useful for inquiry and problem solving. Students will be encouraged to incorporate quantitative skills into independent and interdisciplinary research. This will involve working with spreadsheets, databases, and other computer programs that are useful for environmental decision making.
  3. To enable students to develop skills for conducting environmental analyses. Students meeting the prescribed academic requirements can choose to work as interns in governmental agencies, private businesses, or other non-governmental organizations in order to understand decision making and interdisciplinary cooperation.
  4. To provide students with a framework for evaluating current environmental issues. Courses will provide an historical review of the development of environmental issues and the challenges faced by resource availability, species interactions, and population pressures. Students will examine the ethics of environmental issues through analytical readings, role playing, and discussion.
Special Programs and Opportunities:

Internship in Environmental Science. Senior-level students with an overall GPA of 2.8 (3.0 in major) may do an internship with a private business, a government agency, or non-governmental organization.

Independent research. In lieu of an internship, or for additional advanced elective credit, senior-level students can conduct research under the guidance of a faculty member.

Requirements for Degree in Environmental Science:

B.S. Degree in Environmental Science

General Education Requirements (must include MATH 3351, BIOL 1401,

CHEM 1410, CIS 1320)………………………………………………………48-49 hrs.

ENVR 1405, 2310, 3330, 3340, 4388 or 4395, B A 3320 & 4385,

ECON 2320, CHEM 1420, COMM 2330, GEOS 1410 ……………………..….36 hrs.

Advanced electives from BIOL 3410 or 4430, ENVR 4350, P SC 3310

(or GEOG 3310), GEOG 3320 ………………………………………………….3-4 hrs.

A minor must be completed in one of the following disciplines: Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, Communication, or Geosciences.

Minor in Biology

BIOL 1401, 1402, 1403 …………………………………………………………..12 hrs.

Advanced biology courses …………………………………………………………8 hrs.

20 hrs.

Minor in Business Administration

ACCT 2310 & 2320, ECON 2310 & 2320………………………………………..12 hrs.

Advanced business courses………………………………………………………….6 hrs.

18 hrs.

Minor in Chemistry

CHEM 1410, 1420, 2430, 3410, & 3420…………………………………………..20 hrs.

Minor in Communication

COMM 1310 & 2330 ………………………………………………………………6 hrs.

Twelve additional Communication hours of which 6 advanced………………… 12 hrs.

18 hrs.

Minor in Geosciences

GEOS 1405, 1410, 3422……………………………………………………………12 hrs.

Six additional hours (two hours of which must be advanced) ………………………6 hrs.

18 hrs.

Suggested Course Schedule for the B.S. Degree in Environmental Science

Courses listed are required for the B.S. degree in Environmental Science unless otherwise noted. Students should try to follow this schedule if possible and should consult closely with their advisors each semester, so that they complete prerequisite and required courses in the appropriate sequence and so that they do not overlook courses offered in alternating years. In choosing electives, priority should be given to fulfilling core, general education and minor requirements as soon as possible. Please choose electives to ensure at least 40 hours of advanced work in your degree.

Freshman Year, Semester One Semester Two

ENVR 1405 BIOL 1401

CHEM 1410 CHEM 1420

ENG 1310 ENG 1320

MATH 1311* or higher C IS 1320

Elective Elective

Sophomore Year, Semester One Semester Two

BIOL 1402 BIOL 4 hrs.

GEOS 1410 ECON 2320

COMM 1310 COMM 2330

Elective ENVR 2310 (when offered)

Elective(s)

Junior Year

ENVR 2310 (when offered)

ENVR 3330 or ENVR 3340 when offered

MATH 3351

B A 3320 and 4385

3-4 hrs. from BIOL 3410, BIOL 4430, ENVR 4350, P SC 3310 or GEOG 3320

Electives

Senior Year

ENVR 3330 or 3340 when offered

ENVR 4388 or 4395

Electives

*Higher-level math not required but highly recommended to improve quantitative skills.

Course Descriptions: (ENVR)

1405 Resources and Environment (3-3) No prerequisites. Required for Environmental Science majors. This can be a first course for anyone interested in the earth sciences.It should be the first geoscience course for individuals in the teaching field of Life-Earth Science, for Geoscience minors, and Environmental Science majors. This course counts for general education requirements. A study of earth resources including soils, mineral deposits, energy resources and water. It includes water pollution problems and the closely related problems of waste disposal. Also, hazards of flooding are covered. Several local field trips are taken. Also cross-listed as GEOS 1405 (Fall, Spring).

2310 Contemporary Issues in Environmental Science (3-0) Prerequisites: Envr 1405, BIOL 1401. Required for Environmental Science majors. The course would also be a good elective for education students in the science teaching fields. Building on the principles learned in the prerequisites, this course explores many of the contemporary issues in Environmental Science, such as human population, resource needs, biodiversity, global and regional pollution problems, and the role of economics, politics, and worldview in environmental issues. These issues will be explored using a variety of sources. (Spring, even years)

3330 Environmental Biology (3-0) Prerequisites: At least 12 hours of biology including BIOL 1401 and 1402. Required for Environmental Science majors. A study of the biological and ecological principles that influence the environment. Issues examined include human population trends, habitat loss and alteration, disease and genetic risks, and conservation of natural areas. (Fall odd years)

3340 Environmental Chemistry (3-0) Prerequisite: CHEM 1420. Required for Environmental Science majors. This course explores the chemistry of the Earth's atmospheric, hydrologic, and geologic systems. It includes a study of both naturally functioning environments and degraded environments. A variety of topics will be investigated, including, but not limited to, atmospheric chemistry, photochemical smog, ozone depletion and the ozone hole, aquatic chemistry, acid deposition, and hazardous wastes. (Spring odd years)

4350 Principles of Geographic Information Systems (3-0) Cross-listed as GEOS 4350. Prerequisite: Course in computer science or permission of instructor. An advanced elective in the environmental major. This course introduces students to the techniques of geographic information systems (GIS) which are widely used for land use planning, environmental management, and decision making. Students learn how to make digital maps (for spatial analysis) linked with database information (for attribute analysis). (May Term or by arrangement)

4388 Environmental Internship (3-0) Prerequisites: Senior standing, ENVR 3330 and 3340, overall GPA of 2.8 or above (with GPA of 3.0 or above in major), and permission of instructor. This class or ENVR 4395 is required for majors. An on-the-job work experience under the supervision of professionals in government agencies, regulatory bodies, or corporations with business relating to the environment. (Spring or by arrangement)

4X95 Independent Studies (X-0) Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, ENVR 3330 and 3340, and permission of instructor. This class or ENVR 4388 is required for majors. A study program arranged between an advanced student and an instructor to provide intensive study in a particular area of interest. The course includes a definition of goals appropriate for the advanced student, ways of attaining those goals, a schedule for frequent consultation, and means of measuring progress. (By arrangement)

XX99 Special Topics (X-0) Prerequisites: None. A course of study offered occasionally to groups of students to broaden the departmental curriculum, to meet student demand, or to observe special events. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (By arrangement)

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GEOSCIENCES PROGRAM

Professors Martin, R. Schofield

Mission and Goals:

The Mission of the Geosciences program is:

1. To provide students with an interest in and knowledge about our planet. Classes, labs, and field trips will be used to accomplish these goals.

2. To show students how earth problems such as resource utilization and environmental contamination are not always easy to solve.

3. To show students how the scientific method is used in studying the Earth.

4. To encourage students to be life-long learners and to acquire an interest in the earth that will not end when their geoscience courses are over.

Special Programs and Opportunities:

Field Trips. Field trips are taken to various sites including water treatment plants, a sanitary landfill, and several geologic field areas such as just south of Abilene, to the "hill country" around Llano and Mason, Texas, to the Mineral Wells and Palo Pinto areas, and to the Davis Mountains in southwestern Texas.

Labs. A diversity of work includes hands-on activities with minerals, rocks, and maps. Videos are used to illustrate geologic features in the world which we cannot visit such as active volcanoes. Lab exercises may include microscope work or computer problems using the WorldWide Web.

Requirements for Degrees involving the Geosciences

B.S. Degree in Environmental Science

Please consult the offerings of the Department of Environmental Science

B.S. Degree in Natural Science

Please consult the offerings of the Department of Natural Science.

Teaching Field in Composite Science

Please consult the offerings of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Teaching Field in Life-Earth Science

Please consult the offerings of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Minor in Geosciences

Geos 1405, 1410, 3422 and six additional hours, two hours of which must be advanced.

Course Descriptions : (GEOS)

1405 Resources and Environment (3-3) No prerequisites. This can be a first course for anyone interested in the earth sciences.It should be the first geoscience course for individuals in the teaching field of Life-Earth Science, for Geoscience minors, and Environmental Science majors. This course counts for general education requirements. A study of earth resources including soils, mineral deposits, energy resources and water. It includes water pollution problems and the closely related problems of waste disposal. Also, hazards of flooding are covered. Several local field trips are taken. Also cross-listed as ENVR 1405 (Fall, Spring).

1410 Physical Geology(3-3) No prerequisites. This can be a first course for anyone interested in the earth sciences. It should be the first geoscience course for individuals in the teaching field of Composite Science and the second geoscience course for Natural Science majors, for individuals in the teaching field of Life-Earth Science, Geoscience minors and Environmental Science majors. This course counts for general education requirements. A study of minerals and rocks in the earth’s crust and how they form. It also includes a study of various geologic processes like plate tectonics, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and landslides.One all-day field trip is taken. (Fall, Summer).

2420 Meteorology (3-3) No prerequisites. This can be a first course for anyone interested in the earth sciences. It should be taken in the junior year by individuals in the Life-Earth Science teaching field. This course counts for General Education credit. Introduction to basic meteorology. Students learn how the atmosphere is affected by various factors such as solar influences, pressures and winds. They explore the development of upper-level weather systems and learn short-term forecast techniques. Included in the lab activities is a visit to a local TV station and computer assignments on the internet. Spring semester when possible.

3320 Oceanography(3-0) Junior standing or permission of instructor. This is a required course for individuals in the teaching field of Life-Earth Science. A scientific study of the ocean and its geology, life forms, chemical and physical behavior. (Spring).

XXXX Oceanography(3-3) Junior standing or permission of instructor. This is the same course as X3XX listed above except that it has a lab. (Spring).

3422 Historical Geology(3-3) Prerequisite: GEOS 1410. This should be the second geosciences course for individuals in the Composite Science teaching field, and the third geosciences course in the Life-Earth sciences teaching field and Geoscience minors. The geologic history of Earth, especially North America. The emphasis is on how we interpret past environments by studying the rock record. Brief overview of life history on earth. Two field trips are taken to sites of geologic interest (Spring, on demand).

4350 Principles of Geographic Information Systems (3-0) Cross-listed as ENVR 4350. Prerequisite: Course in computer science or permission of instructor. An advanced elective in the environmental major. This course introduces students to the techniques of geographic information systems (GIS) which are widely used for land use planning, environmental management, and decision making. Students learn how to make digital maps (for spatial analysis) linked with database information (for attribute analysis). (May Term or by arrangement)

4X95 Independent Studies(variable credit). Prerequisites: Geoscience 1405,1410,1420. Upper level elective for Geoscience minors. This is an advanced study or research program arranged between supervising faculty and student which defines goals appropriate for the advanced student, ways of measuring these goals, a schedule for frequent consultation and a means for measuring progress. (by arrangement).

XX99 Special Topics(variable credit) Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Elective for interested students. A course of study offered occasionally to groups of students to broaden program curriculum, to meet student demand, or to observe special events. (by arrangement).

FINE ARTS (F A)

2310 Survey Of Fine Arts (3-0) A survey of the interrelationship of fine arts disciplines (painting, sculpture, music, theatre, architecture, film and photography) and their relationship to political and social change through the course of history. The course will provide a rudimentary knowledge of the fine arts disciplines, with specific emphasis on recognized artistic movements in their historical contexts. (Fall, Spring)

GEOGRAPHY COURSES (GEOG)

3310 Political and Cultural Geography (3-0) Prerequisites: none. A study of the reaction between human culture and its environment, and including urban growth, national development, and influences of geography on history. Focus at local, state, national, and global levels. Required for B.S. teaching field in Composite Social Studies. Requirement option for elementary teaching field "Combination of Subjects." (Also cross-listed as Political Science 3310.) (Fall)

3320 Physical Geography (3-0) Prerequisites: none. A study of the spatial arrangement of the earth’s surface, including development of map reading skills; investigation of varieties of climate, topography, resources, and other physical features at local, state, national, and global levels. (Spring)