History 3351.01

The Early American Republic

Fall 2008

 

Instructor: Dr. Robert F. Pace
Office: 205 OM

Office telephone: 793-3865
Office Hours:
MW: 2:30-3:30; TR: 10:00-12:00; T: 1:00-3:00; OR BY APPOINTMENT
E-mail:
rpace@mcm.edu

 

Course Description:

The United States from the adoption of the Constitution of 1787 through the Mexican War. Political institutions and practices, economic growth, reform movements, and westward expansion are emphasized.

 

Required Texts:

·         John Ferling, Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800.

·         Jack Larkin, The Reshaping of Everyday Life, 1790-1840.

·         Richard Bruce Winders, Crisis in the Southwest: The United States, Mexico, and the Struggle over Texas.


Course Objectives:

The goal of this course is for students to develop the following:
1. Knowledge and understanding of the forces and events that affected the history of the United States from 1787 to 1848.
2. An ability to think critically, analytically, and systematically and to express these thoughts in both oral and written formats.

Course Schedule:

Week One - Aug. 25 - 29:
WASHINGTON IN POWER

 

Week Two –Sept. 1 - 5:
FROM ADAMS TO JEFFERSON

  • Read Ferling Book

 

Week Three - Sept. 8- 12:
JEFFERSON IN POWER

·         Ferling Questions Due on Moodle by Friday (9/12) at midnight

 

Week Four - Sept. 15 - 19:
COMING OF THE WAR OF 1812

 

Week Five - Sept. 22 - 26:

·         Ferling book discussion deadline, Wednesday (9/24), by midnight

·         Friday (9/24): Exam I


Week Six – Sept. 29 - Oct. 3:
WAR AND ITS OUTCOME 

  • Read Larkin Book

 

Week Seven - Oct. 6 - 10:
POST-WAR AMERICA

 

Week Eight - Oct. 13 - 17:
SLAVERY, MONROE, AND ADAMS

·         Larkin Book Questions Due on Moodle by Friday (10/17) at midnight
 

Week Nine - Oct. 20 - 24:
THE RISE OF ANDREW JACKSON

Friday, (10/24)—No class (Homecoming)

 

Week Ten - Oct. 27 – 31
A NEW POLITICAL SYSTEM

 

Week Eleven - Nov. 3 - 7

·         Larkin book discussion deadline, Wednesday (11/5), by midnight

·         Friday,  (11/3) Exam II

Week Twelve - Nov. 10 - 14
 JACKSON'S POLICIES

  • Read Winders Book

 

Week Thirteen - Nov. 17 - 21
THE SECOND PARTY SYSTEM

  • Winders Book Questions Due on Moodle by Friday (11/21) at midnight

 

Week Fourteen - Nov. 24 - 28
THE REFORM ERA

Wednesday and Friday (11/26 & 28) No class-Thanksgiving

 

Week Fifteen - Dec. 1 - 5:
COMING OF THE MEXICAN WAR

·         Winders book discussion deadline, Friday (12/5), by midnight

 

Course Requirements:

Two Midterm Examinations
One Final Examination
Creating Discussion Questions in Moodle

Participating in all reading discussions on Moodle

 

****Note that these assignments are required as part of your passing this class. Failure to complete any of these assignments will result in automatic failure, regardless of your overall average.

 

Grading:

Your final grade in the course will be determined as follows:
Exam I------------------------------------------------200 points
Exam II-----------------------------------------------200 points
Final Exam-------------------------------------------200 points

Attendance/general participation------------------100 points

Discussion Board Question Creation-------------100 points

Discussion Board discussion participation-------200 points

 

Your final grade in this course will be given according to the +/- grade system.  Grades are calculated according to the following totals:

 

925-1000 = A

895-924 = A-

875-894 = B+

825-874 = B

795-824 = B-

775-794 = C+

725-774 = C

695-724 = C-

675-694 = D+

625-674 = D

595-624 = D-

<595 = F

 

Attendance Policy:

Attendance in this class is STRONGLY RECOMMENDED. Because we will follow a lecture/discussion format, class participation is expected. If a student arrives after the roll is taken, it is the student's responsibility to make sure his or her presence has been recorded at the end of the period. If a student has more than three (3) unexcused absences, he or she will receive a “0” for the attendance grade.  


Make-up Policy:
Make-up exams will be administered only when students can show a valid reason for their absence (this means confirmation from either the health center or from the dean). Students must schedule the make-up exam with the instructor within one week of the original exam. Failure to make such arrangements will result in failure of the course.

Accommodations:

McMurry University abides by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which stipulates that no otherwise qualified student shall be denied the benefits of an education "solely by reason of a handicap". If you have a documented disability that may impact your performance in this class and for which you may require accommodations, you must be registered with and provide documentation of your disability to the Disability Services Office, located in Old Main, Room 102. Their phone number is 793-4880. Feel free to contact the instructor with any questions related to disabilities..

 

Moodle Reading Discussions:

For this class we will read three monographs related to the Early American Republic. All students will be placed in one of three groups and assigned to “lead” the Moodle discussions over these readings. When a group’s assigned reading is due for discussion, the group will meet and agree on 10-15 questions to be posted on the Moodle discussion board and designed to generate general discussion about the thesis, arguments, ideas, and context of the readings. All other students in the class will be required to post at least two (2) detailed responses to these questions based on the readings. Each student in a group will receive a “group grade” for the quality of the questions generated. All other students will receive a grade based on the quality and insights evident in their discussion of the reading.


 

Course Objectives/Student Learning Outcomes

and their Linkage to

Program and University Goals and Outcomes.

 

Course Number and Title

History 3351</span>
Early American Republic<span style='font-size:18.0pt'>Leadership and Virtue in American HistoryLeaMexicoM
<span style='font-size:18.0pt'> Fall  2008</span>

 

Desired Student Learning Outcomes for this course

Linked to which departmental program goal(s)

Linked to which institutional goal(s)?

Types of evidence that might be used to demonstrate student achievement of objectives & goals

Knowledge and understanding of the forces and events that affected the history of the United States from 1787 to 1848.

Possess general knowledge of American and World History, with emphasis on skills for historical research and interpretation.

Possess requisite knowledge and skills to teach history at the elementary and secondary levels, or possess requisite knowledge and skills to begin work in post-secondary levels education or related fields.

2, 3, 6

Students will demonstrate this knowledge through responses to questions over each book, and through three exams related to the material of the class.

An ability to think critically, analytically, and systematically and to express these thoughts in both oral and written formats.

Possess general knowledge of American and World History, with emphasis on skills for historical research and interpretation.

Possess requisite knowledge and skills to teach history at the elementary and secondary levels, or possess requisite knowledge and skills to begin work in post-secondary levels education or related fields.

2, 3, 6

Students will demonstrate these skills through creating questions over each book, and through three exams related to the material of the class.

 

Education (aligned with Core Values 1 & 3)

2. Students are equipped for successful careers and post-graduate education.

3. Students acquire an enthusiasm for lifelong learning through expanded intellectual and cultural experiences.

Development (aligned with Core Values 1, 2, 3, & 5)

6. In a community where spiritual, emotional, moral, intellectual, and physical qualities are nurtured, students will grow as whole persons. 

 

 McMurry University's Core Values (as referenced above)

  1. Christian Faith as the foundation of life,
  2. Personal Relationships as the catalyst for life,
  3. Learning as the journey of life,
  4. Excellence as the goal of life, and
  5. Service as the measure of life.