HIST 3375-01

Mexico

Spring 2008

 

Instructor:  Dr. Robert F. Pace                                                      

Office: OM 205

Office Hours: MWF: 11:00-12:00; T: 1:00-3:00; OR BY APPOINTMENT     

Phone: 793-3865

email: rpace@mcm.edu

 

Course Description:

The history of Mexico from prehistoric times to the present: political, economic, social, and intellectual development; United States-Mexican relations.

 

Course Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

·         demonstrate knowledge of the general course and scope of Mexican history, including major political, economic, social, and intellectual developments that shaped that nation.

·         demonstrate the ability to successfully analyze and describe the ideas of major historians of Mexican history through projects related to the assigned readings.

·         demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in both oral and written formats throughout the course.

 

Required Books:

·         Meyer, Sherman, and Deeds. The Course of Mexican History 8th Edition (NOTED AS MEYER IN YOUR CLASS SCHEDULE)

·         Schwartz, ed., Victors and Vanquished: Spanish and Nahua Views of the Conquest of Mexico (NOTED AS SCHWARTZ IN YOUR CLASS SCHEDULE)

·         Bannon, The Spanish Borderlands Frontier, 1513-1821 (NOTED AS BANNON IN YOUR CLOURSE SCHEDULE)

·         Beezley, Judas at the Jockey Club and Other Episodes of Porfirian Mexico (NOTED AS BEEZLEY IN YOUR COURSE SCHEDULE)

 

Course Schedule:

Week 1 (January 14-18): Indian Civilizations of Mexico
Assignment: Meyer, Part I, Chapters 1-5; Begin reading Schwartz book

 

Week 2 (January 21-25): The Spanish Conquest
Assignment: Meyer, Part II, Chapters 6-7

Week 3 (January 28-February 1): Political Organization
Assignment: Meyer, Part III, Chapter 8

Week 4 (February 4-8): Economy of New Spain under the Hapsburgs
Assignment: Meyer, Part III, Chapter 9

Week 5 (February 11-15) The Catholic Church; Spanish Indian Policy
Assignment: Meyer, Part III, Chapters 10-13

 Week 6 (February 18-22): New Spain in the Bourbon Society
Assignment: Meyer, Part IV, Ch. 13-14; Begin reading Bannon book
MONDAY (2/18): EXAM I; Book Dissection of Schwartz book due

Week 7 (February 25-29): Mexican Independence and the First Empire
Assignment: Meyer, Part IV, Chapters 15-16

Week 8 (March 3-7): The Age of Santa Anna
Assignment: Meyer, Part V, Chapters 17-19

 

Week 9 (March 10-14): La Reforma, Intervention, and the Restored Republic
Assignment: Meyer, Part VI, Chapters 20-22

 

 SPRING BREAK (MARCH 17-23)

Week 10 (March 24-28): Second Exam and Guest Speaker
Assignment: Begin reading Beezley book
MONDAY (3/24): No Class—Easter Monday

WEDNESAY (3/26): EXAM II; Bannon Book Dissection Due

FRIDAY (3/28): Guest Speaker: Dr. Dietz from the University of Texas

 

Week 11 (March 31- April 4): The Era of Porfirio Díaz
Assignment: Meyer, Part VII, Chapters 23-25

Week 12 (April 7-11): Madero Presidency and Counterrevolution under Huerta; Revolution in the Era of Carranza
Assignment: Meyer, Part VIII, Chapters 26-30

Week 13 (April 14-17): Social Revolution under Obregón and Calles
Assignment: Meyer, Part IX, Chapters 31-32

Week 14 (April 21-25): Revolutionary Development under Cárdenas
Assignment: Meyer, Part IX, Chapters 32-33

Week 15 (April 28- May 2): The Institutional Revolution and Modern Mexico
Assignment: Meyer, Part X, Chapters 35-39

FRIDAY (5/2): Beezley Book Dissection Due

 

 

Exams:

There will be two in-class exams and one final exam in this class. These exams will consist, primarily, of identification of people, events, and movements identified in class lectures and from the reading. In addition, they will include general essay questions related to major movements, events, and ideas as identified in the lectures and the readings.

 

Book Dissections:

In addition to the main textbook for this class (Meyer) students will be required to read three additional books. For each of these books, students will complete a book dissection exercise. Details of this exercise will be handed out separately in class.

 

Grading:

Your final grade in the course will be determined as follows:
Exam I (200 points)

Schwartz Book Dissection (100 points)
Exam II (200 points)

Bannon Book Dissection (100 points)
Final Exam (200 points)

Beezley Book Dissection (100 points)
Attendance/Participation (100 points)

TOTAL POSSIBLE POINTS=1000

The following grading scale will be observed: A=925-1000; A-=895-924; B+=875-894; B=825-874; B-=795-824; C+=775-794; C=725-774; C-=695-724; D+=675-694; D=625-674; D-=595-624; F=less than 595.

 

 

Attendance:

Attendance in the class is REQUIRED. Because much of the information in this class comes from lectures, absences will place the student significantly behind, therefore, attendance records will be kept. If a student arrives after roll is taken, it is the student's responsibility to make sure his or her presence has been recorded AT THE END OF THAT DAY'S CLASS. Only official University absences are recognized as excused. Unexcused students missing tests can not take a make-up. If a student has more than three (3) unexcused absences, he or she will receive a "0" on the attendance/participation grade. IT IS THE STUDENT'S RESPONSIBILITY TO KEEP TRACK OF ALL DOCUMENTATION OF EXCUSED ABSENCES AND TO BE ABLE TO PRODUCE THEM FOR THE INSTRUCTOR UPON REQUEST.

 

Academic Honesty:

All work for this class is to be the student's own work. Plagiarism (representing another person’s words or ideas as one’s own) will not be accepted, and cheating will not be tolerated. Evidence of plagiarism or cheating on any assignment will result in failure of the class. Additionally, cheating on exams, through use of crib notes or any other means, will result in failure of the class.

 

Note on Disabilities:

McMurry University abides by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which stipulates that no otherwise qualified student shall be denied the benefits of an education "solely by reason of a handicap". If you have a documented disability that may impact your performance in this class and for which you may require accommodations, you must be registered with and provide documentation of your disability to the Disability Services Office, located in Old Main, Room 102. Their phone number is 793-4880. Feel free to contact the instructor with any questions related to disabilities.

 


Course Objectives/Student Learning Outcomes

and their Linkage to

Program and University Goals and Outcomes.

 

Course Number and Title

History 3375</span>
Mexico<span style='font-size:18.0pt'>Leadership and Virtue in American HistoryLeaMexicoM
<span style='font-size:18.0pt'> Spring 2008</span>

 

Desired Student Learning Outcomes for this course

Linked to which departmental program goal(s)

Linked to which institutional goal(s)?

Types of evidence that might be used to demonstrate student achievement of objectives & goals

To demonstrate knowledge of the general course and scope of Mexican history, including major political, economic, social, and intellectual developments that shaped that nation.

Possess general knowledge of American and World History, with emphasis on skills for historical research and interpretation.

Possess requisite knowledge and skills to teach history at the elementary and secondary levels, or possess requisite knowledge and skills to begin work in post-secondary levels education or related fields.

2, 3, 6

Students will demonstrate this knowledge through three major examinations, three writing assignments, and in-class discussion participation.

To demonstrate the ability to successfully analyze and describe the ideas of major historians of Mexican history through projects related to the assigned readings.

 

Possess general knowledge of American and World History, with emphasis on skills for historical research and interpretation.

Possess requisite knowledge and skills to teach history at the elementary and secondary levels, or possess requisite knowledge and skills to begin work in post-secondary levels education or related fields.

2, 3, 6

In three written exercises, the students will discuss both historical interpretations of books, as well as analysis of research and writing.

 

To demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in both oral and written formats throughout the course.

Possess general knowledge of American and World History, with emphasis on skills for historical research and interpretation.

Possess requisite knowledge and skills to teach history at the elementary and secondary levels, or possess requisite knowledge and skills to begin work in post-secondary levels education or related fields.

2, 3, 6

This objective will be measured through three written examinations, three written assignments, and with participation in in-class discussions.

 


Education (aligned with Core Values 1 & 3)

2. Students are equipped for successful careers and post-graduate education.

3. Students acquire an enthusiasm for lifelong learning through expanded intellectual and cultural experiences.

Development (aligned with Core Values 1, 2, 3, & 5)

6. In a community where spiritual, emotional, moral, intellectual, and physical qualities are nurtured, students will grow as whole persons. 

 

 McMurry University's Core Values (as referenced above)

  1. Christian Faith as the foundation of life,
  2. Personal Relationships as the catalyst for life,
  3. Learning as the journey of life,
  4. Excellence as the goal of life, and
  5. Service as the measure of life.