HIST 3377-01

HISTORIOGRAPHY AND RESEARCH METHODS

SPRING 2009

 

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Instructors:    Dr. Robert Pace                                  Dr. Gary Shanafelt

Office:                        Old Main 205                                      Old Main 206

Office Hours: MW: 2:30-3:30                                   MWF 10:00-12:00; 2:30-3:30;

                        TR 10:30-11:30                                   T 1:00-3:00

                        or by appointment                               Th 11:00-12:00; 1:00-3:00;

or by appointment

Phone:            793-3865                                             793-3863

Alt. Phone:     669-6061 (emergencies only)              677-6959 (emerg. only)

Email:             rpace@mcm.edu                                 shanafeg@mcmurryadm.mcm.edu

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The purpose of this class is to introduce the student to the primary philosophy and skills of the historian. This course is an introduction to the discipline of history and a survey of research methodology as employed by historians. Unlike other undergraduate courses in history, it is not a study of the past; instead, it is a study of the philosophy of history, investigative techniques, and the mechanics of historical research.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

The primary objective of this class, therefore, will be for the student to produce a fifteen-page paper, as nearly perfect as possible, based almost exclusively on primary sources, exploiting all readily available materials.

 

This course provides students an opportunity to engage in primary source research and to write a paper at a professional level that is suitable for presentation at a scholarly or professional conference. This course demands that students work at a professional level, setting a standard that should influence all other academic work they undertake after completing HIST 3377. By working through and completing this class, students should gain insights into the discipline of history that had been previously lacking in their academic study. Finishing the paper is the obvious outward goal, but the real benefits of the course are more subtle and more lasting.

 

COURSE BOOKS:

Students will be required to have and use:

ˇ      Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 7th edition (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007).

 



 



 

 

 

COURSE SCHEDULE:

Week 1:

Monday (1/12): Introduction; how to choose a topic; what primary sources are available to you

Wednesday (1/14): Discussion of Topics

Week 2:

Monday (1/19): TOPICS DUE; How to do proper notetaking and research outlining

Wednesday (1/21): how to go to the library and gather research

Week 3:

Monday (1/26): how to formulate research questions

Wednesday (1/28): PROSPECTUS DUE; how do develop a possible thesis

Week 4:

Monday (2/2): Thesis discussion

Wednesday (2/4): Thesis Discussion

Week 5:

NO CLASSES MEET ON MON (2/9) OR WED. (2/11)—EDITORIAL REVIEW BOARD APPOINTMENTS ALL WEEK.

Week 6:

Monday (2/16): How to take notes

Wednesday (2/18): How to take notes; how to cite sources and other fun stuff (Turabian, etc.)

Week 7:

Monday (2/23): how to avoid common writing pitfalls

Wednesday (2/25): how to keep your writing fresh and the topic flowing

Week 8:

Monday (3/2):  Exercises to identify writing strengths and weaknesses

Wednesday (3/4): How to identify problems in your writing

 

SPRING BREAK—(MAR. 17-23)

 

Week 9:

Monday (3/16): FIRST DRAFT DUE AT BEGINNING OF CLASS (make sure you include a copy of the outline you used to create this draft)

Wednesday (3/18): First Draft Returned to Students by beginning of class

 

Week 10:

Monday (3/23): Editing

Wednesday (3/25): Editing

Week 11:

Monday (3/30): Editing

Wednesday (4/1): Editing

 

Week 12 (April 9-13):

Monday: (4/6) Editing

Wednesday (4/8): Editing

Week 13:

Monday (4/13): NO CLASS—EASTER BREAK

Wednesday (4/15): Editing

Week 14:

Monday (4/20): FINAL DRAFT DUE BY BEGINNING OF CLASS

Wednesday (4/22): Historiography

Week 15:

Monday (4/27): Historiography

Wednesday (4/29): Historiography

 

 

 

 

 

GRADING: Final grading in this class will be determined on a 1000-point scale.

Graded assignments will be worth up to:

Proper Topic Chosen by Deadline

50

Prospectus

50

Editorial Review Board Presentation

100

First Draft

100

Quiz Average

100

Participation

100

FINAL DRAFT

500

The following grading scale will be observed for your semester grade.

930-1000= A; 900-929 = A-; 880-899 = B+; 830-879 = B; 800-829 = B-; 780-799 = C+; 770-779 = C ; 700-729 = C-; 680-699 = D+; 630-679 = D; 600-629 = D-; <600 = F


THE FINAL PAPER WILL BE GRADED ACCORDING TO THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:

 

OBJECTIVES

Objective Met?

Points

Content—Sources—25 percent

The presented research is void of plagiarism.

 

 

The research exploits all readily available sources.

 

The research uses a wide variety of sources.

 

Ninety percent of the paper is based on primary sources.

 

Endnotes completely and accurately detail the sources of the paper.

 

Content—Thesis and Evidence—25 percent

An outline accompanies the first draft and the paper clearly demonstrates that the outline was used as a tool in development and writing of the paper.

 

 

A clear thesis appears in the introduction and consistently develops throughout the paper.

 

The thesis stakes out an arguable position.

 

The body of evidence is sufficient to prove the thesis.

 

The evidence has been evaluated critically and discriminatingly.

 

Style—Writing—30 percent

Paper is well organized.

 

 

Sentences show variety and demonstrate an ability to use sophisticated sentence structure.

 

The narrative of the paper is even and clear, effectively and logically transitioning arguments from one paragraph to the other.

 

Word choice is appropriate. Each word has been challenged and found to be the most effective one for the sentence.

 

Style—Format—10 percent

The paper is written in conformance with the style-guide materials handed out in class. 

 

 

The notation style and bibliography conform to the conventions of Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations.

 

Style—Other Factors—10 percent

The title is appropriate and reflects the thesis and content of the paper.

 

 

The paper has an effective introduction that draws in the reader.

 

A compelling conclusion brings the paper to a close.

 

Grammatical, stylistic, and spelling errors are held to an absolute minimum.

 

TOTAL POINTS (out of 100)

 

REVISED TOTAL POINTS (total points x5)

 

Deductions—Careless Errors

 

FINAL SCORE FOR PAPER (revised total points minus C.E.)

 

 


Course Objectives/Student Learning Outcomes

and their Linkage to

Program and University Goals and Outcomes.

 

Course Number and Title

History 3377</span>
<span style='font-size:18.0pt'>Leadership and Virtue in American HistoryLea Historiography and Methods
<span style='font-size:18.0pt'> Spring 2009</span>

 

Desired Student Learning Outcomes for this course

Linked to which departmental program goal(s)

Linked to which institutional goal(s)?

Types of evidence that might be used to demonstrate student achievement of objectives & goals

To produce a fifteen-page paper, as nearly perfect as possible, based almost exclusively on primary sources, exploiting all readily available materials.

 

Possess general knowledge of American and World History, with emphasis on skills for historical research and interpretation.

Possess requisite knowledge and skills to teach history at the elementary and secondary levels, or possess requisite knowledge and skills to begin work in post-secondary levels education or related fields.

2, 3, 6

Students will write multiple drafts of a major research paper according to the stated objectives. The final draft will be graded by two professors using a grading rubric delineating multiple aspects of the objectives.

 

 

Education (aligned with Core Values 1 & 3)

2. Students are equipped for successful careers and post-graduate education.

3. Students acquire an enthusiasm for lifelong learning through expanded intellectual and cultural experiences.

Development (aligned with Core Values 1, 2, 3, & 5)

6. In a community where spiritual, emotional, moral, intellectual, and physical qualities are nurtured, students will grow as whole persons. 

 

 McMurry University's Core Values (as referenced above)

  1. Christian Faith as the foundation of life,
  2. Personal Relationships as the catalyst for life,
  3. Learning as the journey of life,
  4. Excellence as the goal of life, and
  5. Service as the measure of life.