<!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"><div class=Section1><span style='font-size:18.0pt'>History 4320</span>
<span style='font-size:18.0pt'>The Old South</span>
<span style='font-size:18.0pt'> Fall 2007</span>

Instructor:  Dr. Robert F. Pace
Office Hours: MW 2:30-4:30; TR 10:30-12:00; T 1:00-4:00; OR BY APPOINTMENT
Office:  Old Main 205
Office Phone: 793-3865
e-mail: rpace@mcm.edu

 

CLICK HERE TO GO TO FALL 2007 DEBATE SITE

 


Course Description:

A study of the southern distinctiveness from colonial times to 1865, including an examination of the plantation system, race, slavery, religion, gender, Native Americans, cultural continuity, and geographical dimensions.  Themes include the growth of southern nationalism, social history, and a discussion of the origins of a distinctive South.

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Required Texts:

·         John B. Boles, Black Southerners, 1619-1869.

·         Charles C. Bolton and Scott P. Culclasure, eds. The Confessions of Edward Isham:  A Poor White Life in the South.

·         Robert F. Pace, Halls of Honor: College Men in the Old South

 


Course Objectives:

1. To build an understanding of the people, ideas, culture, economy, and customs that collectively made the antebellum South a unique region in our country's history.

2. To be able to communicate effectively thoughts and ideas about the Old South in both written and oral formats.

3. To be able to use different forms of historical information, apply critical analysis to this information, and show evidence of this analytical ability in both written exams, oral presentations, and through research papers.

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</div>Course Schedule:

Week 1 (August 27-31):
Assignment: Begin Black Southerners

Week 2 (Sept. 3-7):
Assignment: Continue Black Southerners

Week 3 (Sept. 10-14):
Assignment: Continue Black Southerners

<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">Week 4 (Sept. 17-21):
Assignment: Complete Black Southerners; Begin Halls of Honor

</span><span lang=FR style='mso-ansi-language:FR'><o:p></o:p></span>Week 5 (Sept. 24-28):
Assignment: Continue Halls of Honor

Week 6 (Oct. 1-5)
Assignment: Continue Halls of Honor

FRIDAY (10/5): NO CLASS (Homecoming Break)

Week 7 (Oct. 8-12):,  
Assignment: Complete Halls of Honor

<span style="mso-spacerun: yes"></span>Week 8 (Oct. 15-19):
MONDAY (10/15):MIDTERM PT. I
WEDNESDAY (10/17):MIDTERM PT. II

Week 9 (Oct. 22-26):
Assignment: Begin Confessions of Edward Isham

Week 10 (Oct. 29-Nov. 2)
Assignment: Continue Confessions of Edward Isham;

Week 11 (Nov. 5-9):
Assignment:  Continue Confessions of Edward Isham;

Week 12 (Nov. 12-16):
Assignment:  Continue Confessions of Edward Isham <![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]><![endif]>

Week 13 (Nov. 19-23): NOTE: NO CLASS WED. OR FRI. (Thanksgiving Break)
Assignment:  Continue Confessions of Edward Isham

Week 14 : (Nov. 26-30): 
Assignment: Continue Confessions of Edward Isham

Week 15 (Dec. 3-7):

Assignment: Finish Confessions of Edward Isham

Week 16 (Dec. 10-14):
FINAL EXAM 

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Course Requirements:

Midterm: October 15 and 17
Persuasive Speech
In-Class debates
Research Paper
Final Examination

***Note that these assignments are required as part of your passing this class.  Failure to complete any of these assignments will result in automatic failure, regardless of your overall average.

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Grading:

Your final grade in the course will be determined as follows:
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Attendance

50 points

Midterm 

250 points 

Persuasive Speech

100 points

Debate Participation 

150 points 

Research Paper

200 points 

Final Exam 

250 points 

 

 

The following grading scale will be observed for the semester: 

930-1000

 A <span style="mso-spacerun: yes">

 

730-779

 C

900-929

 A-

 

700-729

 C-

880-899

 B+

 

680-699

 D+

830-879

 B

 

630-679

 D

800-829

 B-

 

600-629

 D-

780-799

 C+

 

 

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Attendance Policy:

Attendance in the class is REQUIRED.  Because much of the information in this class comes from lectures, absences will place the student significantly behind, therefore, attendance records will be kept.  If a student arrives after roll is taken, it is the student's responsibility to make sure his or her presence has been recorded AT THE END OF THAT DAY'S CLASS.  Only official University absences are recognized as excused. Unexcused students missing tests can not take a make-up.  If a student has more than three (3) unexcused absences, he or she will receive a "0" on the attendance grade.  IT IS THE STUDENT'S RESPONSIBILITY TO KEEP TRACK OF ALL DOCUMENTATION OF EXCUSED ABSENCES AND TO BE ABLE TO PRODUCE THEM FOR THE INSTRUCTOR UPON REQUEST. STUDENTS WHO MISS CLASS FOR A UNIVERSITY-SANCTIONED ATHLETIC OR ACADEMIC EVENT SHOULD INFORM THE INSTRUCTOR IN ADVANCE OF EACH CLASS THE STUDENT WILL MISS. THE STUDENT SHOULD FOLLOW UP WITH THE INSTRUCTOR THE CLASS PERIOD FOLLOWING THE ABSENCE TO MAKE SURE THAT THE ABSENCE HAS BEEN RECORDED AS EXCUSED. E-MAILS TO THE INSTRUCTOR FROM THE VPAA’S OFFICE DO NOT CONSTITUTE INFORMING THE INSTRUCTOR—THEY ARE MERELY CONFIRMATION OF INFORMATION THE STUDENT IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CONVEYING.<![if !supportEmptyParas]> <![endif]><o:p></o:p>

Unexcused absences on debate days will also result in a lowering of the student’s participation grade.<span style='color:windowtext'><o:p></o:p></span><![if !supportEmptyParas]> <![endif]><o:p></o:p><div class=MsoNormal align=center style='text-align:center'>

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Make-up Policy

Make-up exams will be administered only when students can show a valid reason for their absence (this means confirmation from either a doctor or from the dean).  Students must schedule the make-up exam with the instructor within one week of the original exam.  Failure to make such arrangements will result in failure of the course.

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DEBATES:

    In southern colleges during the antebellum period, students gained a large portion of their educations with Literary Debating Societies.  Almost every southern college had at least two of these societies organized and run completely by the students.  These societies had weekly meetings lasting from two to four hours each.  At each meeting a topic was chosen for debate and at least one student was selected to argue the "pro" and another to argue the "con."  With this method of learning, educated southern men became especially adept at making strong arguments to support their positions in places of power like state legislatures and the US Congress.  It has been said often that more education took place in these literary societies than in the classroom in southern colleges.

  This semester, we are going to attempt a facsimile of this old educational tradition in our classroom.  First we will divide the class into debating societies.  During several weeks of the semester, there will be a question open for debate and every student will take one turn during the semester representing their society in arguing the question.  On Fridays of a debate week, the class time will be set aside for two students, previously selected, to argue the major points of the question, one student taking the pro, the other taking the con.  The instructor will decide which student takes which side of the argument.  Each student will make a five- to ten-minute presentation based on research he or she has done on the topic (I have articles and article suggestions for all of these topics, so come see me for research advice).  Other members of that students' society are encouraged to help the student with other sources and arguments in advance of the debate (remember, the entire team or society will benefit if their arguments are the strongest).  After the presentations, the entire class is encouraged to join the debate (in an orderly fashion).  The instructor will serve as a moderator.  At the end of the period, just as in the old societies, the class will vote for which society "won" the debate.  The instructor will also have two votes he can use at his discretion.  In addition, the professor will occasionally invite other historians and guests to attend these debates. These guests will also be able to ask questions and will have a vote for the winner.

    At the end of the semester, the society with the most "wins" will get twenty points added to their final grade.  The society that comes in second will get ten points added, and the society that comes in third will get five points added.

    Students will be graded on their presentations.  Grading criteria will include content, research, strength of argument, communication skills, and overall presentation.  All students will receive a participation grade for adding to the debate on any given Friday.  Absences on debate days will be duly noted and should only occur if absolutely necessary.  If a student misses more than one debate, he or she will be required to complete extra assignments as provided by the instructor to make up for that missed debate.  Failure to make up these assignments will result in a reduction of BOTH the participation and debate grades for that student.

This should be a fun and informative project for all of us, so work hard and you will see great results.

Debate Topics, debate teams, and debate dates will be distributed during the second week of class <div class=MsoNormal align=center style='text-align:center'>.

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Research Paper:

All students will complete one 7- to 10-page, double-spaced (12 pt. type, 1” margins all around) research paper during the semester. The paper will be argumentative in nature, and will coincide with the debate position that student will argue for his or her debate assignment. Students should use the Department Style Guide for reference in citing sources and all other format concerns. The style guide can be found at: http://www.mcm.edu/newsite/web/academics/cas/history/style.htm. Students should use at least four scholarly sources in addition to the assigned readings. Internet primary sources are acceptable, but students should use caution in using some websites as sources for information for these papers, as many sites on issues of southern history tend to be polemical, without much concern for actual research or historical accuracy.

The paper is due on the day of that student’s debate. Ten points a day will be deducted for every day the paper is late (including weekends).  ALL PAPERS SHOULD BE SENT TO DR. PACE ELECTRONICALLY VIA E-MAIL, OR SAVED electronically in some format that can be transferred safely to Dr. Pace’s computer and can be read in a Microsoft Word readable format (.doc, .rtf, etc.).  It is essential that students keep at least one extra back-up copy of this electronic paper, as occasionally files get deleted or corrupted when dealing with things electronic. A corrupted file or lost paper will not constitute a valid excuse for lateness on this assignment. Dr. Pace will be submitting all papers to Turnitin.com to check for plagiarism, so it is imperative that all papers represent the students’ own work.  Further instructions on the requirements of the papers will be handed out in class. <div class=MsoNormal align=center style='text-align:center'>

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Note on Disabilities:

McMurry University abides by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which stipulates that no otherwise qualified student shall be denied the benefits of an education "solely by reason of a handicap". If you have a documented disability that may impact your performance in this class and for which you may require accommodations, you must be registered with and provide documentation of your disability to the Disability Services Office, located in Old Main, Room 102. Their phone number is 793-4880. Feel free to contact the instructor with any questions related to disabilities.<div class=MsoNormal align=center style='text-align:center'>

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<span style='color:black'>Academic Honesty</span>

All work for this class is to be the student's own work. Plagiarism will not be accepted, and cheating will not be tolerated. "Literary Society" members may help each other on gathering resources for their debates, but speeches and research papers must be completed by each student on his/her own. Evidence of cheating on these projects will result in failure of the class. Additionally, cheating on exams, through use of crib notes or any other means, will result in failure of the class.

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Course Objectives/Student Learning Outcomes

and their Linkage to

Program and University Goals and Outcomes.

 

Course Number and Title

History 4320</span>
<span style='font-size:18.0pt'>The Old South</span>
<span style='font-size:18.0pt'> Fall 2007</span>

 

Desired Student Learning Outcomes for this course

Linked to which departmental program goal(s)

Linked to which institutional goal(s)?

Types of evidence that might be used to demonstrate student achievement of objectives & goals

To build an understanding of the people, ideas, culture, economy, and customs that collectively made the antebellum South a unique region in our country's history

Possess general knowledge of American and World History, with emphasis on skills for historical research and interpretation.

Possess requisite knowledge and skills to teach history at the elementary and secondary levels, or possess requisite knowledge and skills to begin work in post-secondary levels education or related fields.

2, 3, 6

Two major written examinations, one major argumentative research paper, persuasive speech, participation in debates.

To be able to communicate effectively thoughts and ideas about the Old South in both written and oral formats.

Possess general knowledge of American and World History, with emphasis on skills for historical research and interpretation.

Possess requisite knowledge and skills to teach history at the elementary and secondary levels, or possess requisite knowledge and skills to begin work in post-secondary levels education or related fields.

2, 3, 6

Two major written examinations, one major argumentative research paper, persuasive speech, participation in debates.

To be able to use different forms of historical information, apply critical analysis to this information, and show evidence of this analytical ability in both written exams, oral presentations, and through research papers.

Possess general knowledge of American and World History, with emphasis on skills for historical research and interpretation.

Possess requisite knowledge and skills to teach history at the elementary and secondary levels, or possess requisite knowledge and skills to begin work in post-secondary levels education or related fields.

2, 3, 6

Two major written examinations, one major argumentative research paper, persuasive speech, participation in debates.

 


Education (aligned with Core Values 1 & 3)

2. Students are equipped for successful careers and post-graduate education.

3. Students acquire an enthusiasm for lifelong learning through expanded intellectual and cultural experiences.

Development (aligned with Core Values 1, 2, 3, & 5)

6. In a community where spiritual, emotional, moral, intellectual, and physical qualities are nurtured, students will grow as whole persons. 

 

 McMurry University's Core Values (as referenced above)

  1. Christian Faith as the foundation of life,
  2. Personal Relationships as the catalyst for life,
  3. Learning as the journey of life,
  4. Excellence as the goal of life, and
  5. Service as the measure of life.