BIMS

A Day in the Life...

March Madness

by gwilson on Mar.19, 2016, under A Day in the Life...

mcmgymAny basketball lovers out there?  If so, you probably are like me and have a love-hate relationship with the NCAA Division I basketball tournament – March Madness.  It is a time when anything is possible, any team entering the field has that dream that if they can just string together 6 perfect games they can win a national championship.  I was in love with March Madness back in the early 90s, when I chose three of the final four and ultimate champion Arkansas.  Contrast that to this year, where two of the teams I pegged for the final four were eliminated in the first game.  Like everyone, I try to predict the early upsets, and I actually hit on one – Arkansas-Little Rock defeating Purdue.  I had to root for UALR because their coach, Chris Beard, as coach at McMurry not so many years ago.

I think there are some similarities between the highs and lows of March Madness and our BIMS program.  Like selection Sunday, where there’s great anticipation about what teams will “go to the dance”, our recruiting season is a time of great anticipation as we await those who place their deposits, sign up for SOAR, and enroll as our majors each summer.  And just like the tournament itself, there are those very talented students who stumble and those underdogs who achieve beyond anyone’s expectations.  College, after all, is the greatest participation sport you can imagine.

So what are the similarities and differences that make some students succeed and others flame out?  Just look at the Cinderella teams in the tournament.  They tend to have great coaching, better than average talent, and lots of heart and determination.  They are so focused on the tournament that they do not let any distractions or other interests get in their way.  And they leave their entire effort out there on the floor.  When our students commit every bit of their talent and effort to pursuing their education, they always come away winners.

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Spring on the Horizon

by gwilson on Jan.03, 2016, under A Day in the Life...

pyp_crewWe enter 2016 with great excitement for the Spring 2016 semester.  Here are some things on the horizon…

  • Science Saturday! January 23rd will feature an open house for the sciences at McMurry.  Science Saturday is an opportunity for the community, and in particular regional high school educators and students, to come experience the unique flavor of McMurry’s science programs.  There will be hands-on events sponsored by our science faculty and students.  Biology will host three sessions – one an exercise is studying population diversity in an ecological setting, another a forensic science activity using conventional and molecular techniques, and a third centered on epidemiological investigation of a mock disease outbreak.  In each case, students and other visitors take on the role of scientist to see how knowledge is put into action to solve real-world problems.
  • Honors Research! This spring we will have only one Honors student completing Honors research.  The student is Taylor Russell, standout basketball player for the Lady War Hawks.  Her project is using molecular techniques to investigate whether microbial populations in traditional Winogradsky columns are also supported in diatomaceous earth (DE) columns (now becoming known as Benoit Columns in reference to their discoverer, our own Dr. Tom Benoit).  We are eagerly anticipating the results from the epigenetic analysis because it is likely some of the microbes discovered could be members of the new domains of organisms first reported this summer.
  • Faculty Research! With the announcement that four of our Biology faculty received KIVA grants and Sam Taylor Research Fellowships, the move will be on to study bats and plant diversity and invasive crab species and mole migration patterns.  Students will be given the opportunity to dive in and learn as they conduct research.
  • And Speaking of Grants…. The department will be deeply involved in the writing of a major grant that has the potential to transform McMurry sciences.  This multi-year, multi-million dollar grant would bring improved spaces and equipment and new opportunities and programs to our current and future students.  More on this as we get deeper into 2016!

So there you have it.  Lots to be excited about as a War Hawk BIMS student!  May this be a great year for us all!

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Research

by gwilson on Nov.21, 2015, under A Day in the Life...

DSCN3124We believe strongly in our approach to research at McMurry.  We see research as not being the “other” thing professors do after they have completed their teaching for the week; we see research as a great teaching tool for the average student.  For instance, in Microbiology this semester the final project students are doing is determining whether their cell phones put out sufficient radiation to mutate the Staphylococci they isolated and identified from their bathrooms during project two.  By doing this, they are learning literature searches, experimental design, development of antibiotic resistance by bacteria through random mutations (or in this case radiation-induced mutations), and scientific writing.  All good skills we would have expected from our capstone students (well, the mutagenesis probably would’ve been some other investigation).  Here, they are doing these things as sophomores.  Similar approaches to research as a teaching tool are seen in many other BIMS courses, starting with their yeast fermentation experiments in their first semester General Biology I course.

But beyond research in regular lab courses, we also expect every student to have a capstone project involving research or internship.  Research project currently in progress include the following:

  • Studying the metagenomics of populations arising in Winogradsky columns vs. those of populations arising in Benoit columns (our Dr. Benoit has developed an alternative formulation for Winogradsky columns that uses diatomaceous earth instead of actual water source sediment as the basis for the solid phase of the column – see prior posts for more on this!).  We are determining whether the Benoit column develops similar population profiles as those arising using actual sediment.
  • Studying the presence of Coronaviruses in bat populations.  Bat guano is collected and screened using genomic tools.  Methodology began with samples recovered from museum specimens and has progressed to catching bats in the field and obtaining fresh samples.
  • Studying the genomics of moles from museums around the nation to determine the biogeography and distribution of unique populations.  Discovery of the westernmost specimens in Texas by one of our professors has led to this study to figure out which eastern population was the source so that a migration map can be constructed.
  • Recovery of antimicrobial and anti-cancer chemicals from regional plants.  Samples are obtained, studied chemically and physiologically for antibacterial properties on the McMurry campus.  Collaborations between our faculty and those at other universities (University of San Francisco, Baylor University, and University of Pennsylvania) allow more advanced chemical analysis and anti-cancer screening assays.
  • Studying the migration of crabs from coastal areas to inland lakes in Texas.  Lots of time is spent sampling regional lakes for the presence of these invasive species to determine routes and methods they use for finding new freshwater habitats.  A parallel study to this is the attempt to breed the crabs in captivity, something that has never been successfully done.

Is this it?  Is this all our students have to choose from?  Nope.  This is simply the projects currently underway.  We hope others will join our Research Teams and find their own, unique project from these and other options available at McMurry

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