BIMS

Archive for August, 2011

BIMS Mixer this Thursday

by gwilson on Aug.30, 2011, under Program

bimsmixer commercialThursday evening from 5:30-7:00 will be a come-and-go reception for BIMS students and those interested in the program. Food will be provided.  Returning BIMS students are encouraged to come and welcome the new freshmen.  Meet the faculty, learn about the program, enjoy good food.  And find out about the upcoming BIMS Classic Cinema Series, where medically-oriented movies will take center stage.  Popcorn, good movies, fun fellowship – all will be central to the BIMS Classic Cinema Series.

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Research Directions 2012

by gwilson on Aug.18, 2011, under Projects

Every year the BIMS faculty sits down and discusses what research they might pursue for the sake of teaching and capstone projects.  With the start of school only a week away, we have narrowed our focus to a couple of very promising avenues for student research.  We thought you might like to know what’s made it to the top of our list for possible projects…

Crystal panel colors1. Bioactive compounds in the environment.  Last year we began work to gear up use of the yeast estrogen screening (YES) assay to test soils and waters for the presence of estrogen-mimic compounds.  Such compounds have been implicated in estrogen-fueled cancers, early onset of puberty, and other such health issues.  Our early discussions this year have included involvement of Biochemistry in the use of the screen for testing area ground water and soils while Biology capstone students (BIMS 4201) may pursue use of biofermenters to produce mixed populations of microbes capable of destroying the chemicals.  So, using our resources to identify the problem and find solutions.  I like that!

DSCN37852. Spore physiology and ecology.  During my doctoral research, I made some discoveries that have gone unreported and have not been pursued since.  My work was on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), a  bacterium of economic importance because of the insecticidal crystal protein produced when it forms spores.  Unlike the rest of the Bt world at the time, my interest was not in the crystal but in the biology of the spore.  A part of that work involved studying, essentially, how diet influenced spore properties.  I found those spores created in high sugar environments were larger and more resistant to heat, UV, and harsh chemicals, and germinated differently than did spores created in low sugar environments.  I am teaching an Advanced Microbiology course (BIMS 4491) this fall where the students will resume the research with our goal to present results at the Texas Branch ASM meetings in March and to publish our results before the end of the year.  Students leaving McMurry with presentations and publications is a good thing! :)  Because the work is so expansive and offers so many opportunities for students to jump on-board, other students doing capstones may also find a piece of this puzzle they want to pursue.  This research teaches some great basic biology and microbiology and has tremendous biomedical importance – after all, Bt is the simulant used for research on anthrax!

Some might look at the type of work our students pursue at McMurry and determine that the research done here is not as “cutting edge” and sophisticated as that done at large universities.  Rightly so, and without apologies!  Our intent is not to invite undergraduates to wash dishes or “piddle around” on the fringes of our research, but to be the main contributors to our work – much as graduate students are at those large universities. Every student is exposed to research here, and they are integral to our progress – not footnotes to graduate students’ success!  Their work is the main course, the entree and not the parsley and onion soup.  The fact of the matter is there are always plenty of questions of interest and importance to be answered that are left behind as the juggernaut of big science crashes forward.  We will gladly fill in the blanks left behind as they rush onward.  Such questions provide a fertile ground for learning and discovery.  We are student-centered in our teaching and in our research.  BIMS at McMurry is simply “science done better”.

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Busy Summer Yields New Software Release

by gwilson on Aug.09, 2011, under A Day in the Life...

labscenecropThis fall at universities around the world, some students will engage in a two-pronged approach to learning the knowledge and skills of microbiology lab technique.  They will learn the conventional way, loop and burner and tubes and plates, and they will expand their opportunity to think like a microbiologist and simulate their lab work using their computers with software developed by Dr. Gary Wilson and his partners at Intuitive Systems, Inc.  The software, VirtualUnknown(TM) Microbiology, is now over a decade old, and this summer marks the end of a two year-long development program to create a new, more versatile version.  Dr. Wilson’s son, Marcus Wilson, has been the Java-developer making it all happen.

indolechoosekovacsThe original VU Microbiology was developed with particular goals in mind:  solid microbiology instruction, true-to-life simulation requiring knowledge of aseptic technique, opportunities for students to make mistakes with consequences, detailed reporting in the Virtual Lab Report of all errors in technique and judgment – all in a game-like atmosphere.  Judging by the popularity of the software with allied health programs, it scores on all points.  But the leaps in technology over the past ten years have necessitated parallel improvements in the software.  Whereas the original product was PC-exclusively and largely stand-alone, the new version will be “platform neutral” and Web-based.  Testing on Mac, Linux, and Windows have all gone well, meaning any student with any computer will soon have equal access to this tool.  VirtualUnknown(TM) Microbiology Web Edition (VUWEB) will be “Micro Anywhere!” incarnate.

mdmcover 811

To make that happen, Dr. Wilson has spent the summer taking care of the content and support components, while Marcus has been polishing the look, feel, and action of the software.  Several tests were replaced with updated versions.  New Help files had to be created that accounted for the current state of computer skills in average students, rather than on the average computer skills of 1998.  A new lab activities manual was written, entitled Micro Digital Media(TM), along with an instructor’s key.  MDM gets right to the nuts and bolts of microbiology and spends its 100 pages helping students learn how lab skills are used in a health setting.  There is even an exercise to help students learn how to make fancy research posters to display their work.

What’s left?  The Help files are text- and graphic-centered,  but will also have extensive videos still in production.  And there’s extensive beta testing to come.  Anticipated product release will be Spring 2012.

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