BIMS

Our Guiding Principles – Part 5

by gwilson on Jul.31, 2012, under Uncategorized

malaney presentation 2I have a friend who as a graduate student invested five years into a research project in immunology.  She walked into a meeting with her dissertation committee one summer thinking it was the last briefing on her work before defending for her doctorate, and left the room with a non-thesis masters.  Something in her project had gone terribly wrong in the eyes of the committee and five years of work and promise ended up worthless in the end for an unsuspecting graduate student.  She was a determined student and started over in another program and in about four more years received her doctorate.  What a horror story!

Our fifth guiding principle is “choose projects with a high probability of success“.  We do not believe in placing students in situations where the outcome of their capstone work could leave them with nothing to show for the semester.  There are two ways we do this.  First, we do not allow students to enter into research where the results are a huge gamble – “win big or go home” is not our idea of sound research…at least not with a student’s first self-designed project conducted in their last year of college as a requirement for graduation.  For this reason, we seldom allow students to start with a blank piece of paper for their design.  Student-conceived project ideas tend to be too grandiose and risk-laden to be practical under our timeline.  Remember our other guiding principles:  ”Keep it simple, keep it short!”, and “Just because we can, doesn’t mean we should!”  So, we talk with the student and try to steer them into projects where the basic infrastructure and literature base and track record for results are clearly established on our campus.  Then we talk about what is known in the literature and what is not known, allowing the student to carve out a short, simple project that is meaningful (has unknown outcomes and thus represents real research).  So, you might say the project is student chosen from within departmental imposed parameters.

The second way we help students build a project with a high probability of success is through careful attention to experimental design.  We pride ourselves on helping students design projects that maximize results while minimizing work and time.  We want students to complete their planned experiments, conduct follow-up experiments, and produce their research paper or poster quickly.  That can only happen in this way.  So, we make sure that the first experiment (the initial planned work by the student) provides data that is unique and useful whatever the outcome. Experiments that either work or don’t work are not considered (the suggestion from that is either success or failure is the only result possible).  Instead, experiments are designed with the follow-up experiment in mind – if it turns out this way, we’ll do this…but if it turns out that way, we’ll do that.  By taking this approach, we teach students the importance of not just designing an experiment, but planning a project.

In the coming months, take a look at our webpage where the results of student capstone projects will be posted.  It is called “The Lab Report”. (http://blogs.mcm.edu/thelabreport/)

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