BIMS

Wax on, wax off!

by gwilson on May.22, 2013, under A Day in the Life...

waxonwaxoffBIMS 1300 is a bit of an unusual course to start the BIMS major out on.  The title is “Introduction to Scientific Research”, and yet we spend the majority of our time playing and designing games, with only limited time spent discussing the scientific method, the structure of a scientific paper, and the importance of ethical and moral behavior in the sciences.  So it might come as a shock that one of the key features of the final exam is the analysis of a scientific paper taken from the Journal of Invertebrate Pathology.

All semester long, I have been telling the 33 students in the class (mostly freshmen) that our approach to learning how scientific research is conducted is taken from “The Karate Kid” – we do things seemingly unrelated to science to learn about science.  So we played games to learn about variable and constants, how to use deductive reasoning to isolate variables in order to win the game.  The mid-term exam included a simple Sudoku!  We read excerpts from “Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman” to learn about observation and controlled experimental design.  I give them an article called “Delusions of Gender” that is a great example of how inductive reasoning can go awry if taken beyond the limits of logic.   We ran through examples of research misconduct and discussed the high costs of research and played “The Lab” at the NIH-ORI website.

And their final exam included evaluation of a scientific paper.  They told me which paragraphs fit into each part of an IMRAD format paper.  They evaluated logic used in the Results and Discussion section.  They identified variables and constants in the table and figure.  Then, on page two of the exam they looked at a flawed study, pointed out the mistakes and designed a better approach.  And they explained how the games their groups created use these same methods and approaches and skills.

How did they do?  As students in the course have done over the past four years, they were able to show me they “get it” about how we use the tools of science on a daily basis as we go about our decision-filled lives.  And I am certain the experience of this class will help our students approach their sophomore classes, including organic chemistry, genetics, and human physiology from a more critical and thoughtful perspective.

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