BIMS

Tag: biomedical science

2012 Academic Awards

by gwilson on Apr.01, 2012, under Students

mcm_radford_logoThis afternoon, McMurry hosted its 2012 Academic Awards Luncheon, where the outstanding academic performances of the year are celebrated.  Here are the recipients for the Biomedical Science Program:

Outstanding First Year Student:  Heather Rawls (she also was the outstanding freshman chemistry student!)

Outstanding Second Year Student:  Christina Barr

Outstanding Third Year Student: Toyosi Adewunmi

Outstanding Fourth Year Student:  Chris Tatum

Danny Cooley Award Winner:  Brad Rowland

The Danny Cooley Award is in memory of McMurry alum Dr. Danny Cooley, who as a graduate student in the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at TTU discovered the cause of sick building syndrome.  Danny was an outstanding student, war veteran, decorated firefighter, and man of great character.  The recipient exhibits similar qualities and receives a financial award to help with the cost of their education.

In addition to the BIMS program awards, other BIMS majors also received awards from other areas of campus for their academic achievements.

Recently declared BIMS major Nicole McGunegle was named Outstanding First Year Writer by the Department of English.

Miranda Nguyen received the All-Conference Distinguished Scholar-Athlete Award for Women’s Soccer.

Our congratulations to each of these students!  BIMS majors are widely acknowledge as among the best students on campus and you make us proud!

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Connections

by gwilson on Feb.23, 2012, under Program

golf cartAnyone who has traveled to or from a place off-the-beaten-path knows that the most stressful part of the trip often centers on making your connections.  Completing one leg of a trip is all well and good, but starting the next leg depends on all the pieces falling into place at the right time and the right place.

Attention to the logistics between stages of life can make those transitions between programs less stressful and subject to disruption!  At McMurry, the BIMS program is working to smooth out connections for students in pursuit of their career goals in biotech, forensics, and the health professions.  We are creating ways to seamlessly connect a junior college program in Biotech with our BIMS degree, and our BIMS program with a variety of graduate and professional programs for our majors and graduates.

Students completing their certification in biotechnology from Cisco College can receive BIMS program credit when they enter McMurry to pursue a BS in Biomedical Science degree.  The seamless connections do not stop there.  Our BIMS majors can choose to pursue one of our early acceptance/early admission articulations with dental or physical therapy schools.  Similar agreements are being developed with schools of pharmacy, chiropractic, and other health professions, and with a graduate program in biotechnology.  As these are finalized, expect announcements through this webpage.

Suffice it to say, BIMS wants to insure our students “make their connections” along their journey toward their pursuit of health professions careers.  A veritable golf cart honking its way through the crowd at the airport, getting our students from one stage of life to the next.

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Real-life CSI!

by gwilson on Feb.06, 2012, under Projects

fly clip artFor the past decade, one of the most popular television franchises has been CSI, where the tools of forensic science are used to solve crime.  The BIMS program was created to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to join their TV counterparts to help bring criminals to justice.

But forensic science is MUCH more than DNA fingerprinting and other biotech and immunological methods.  Sometimes, the key evidence is provided by six-legged pests.  This semester, upper level students in Dr. Tierney Brosius’ Entomology class and two capstone students are joining scientists from universities across the country in a project being directed by the University of Nebraska to study chemical attractants that draw flies to decaying flesh and to see what species are most commonly attracted by which chemical.

To do their work, students will create bait traps containing suspect chemicals and scatter them around campus.  Then, over the course of many days the flies attracted will be counted and identified to search for patterns and answers.  Results will be added to those from students from other schools to see whether there are regional differences in effective chemicals and in species attracted.

More than anything, such studies provide students with valuable experience participating in the industry of science.  But another benefit is the realization that the glamour and simplicity of television science and technology come about through long, hard work done by dedicated researchers.

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