Tag: capstone project


by gwilson on Nov.21, 2015, under A Day in the Life...

DSCN3124We believe strongly in our approach to research at McMurry.  We see research as not being the “other” thing professors do after they have completed their teaching for the week; we see research as a great teaching tool for the average student.  For instance, in Microbiology this semester the final project students are doing is determining whether their cell phones put out sufficient radiation to mutate the Staphylococci they isolated and identified from their bathrooms during project two.  By doing this, they are learning literature searches, experimental design, development of antibiotic resistance by bacteria through random mutations (or in this case radiation-induced mutations), and scientific writing.  All good skills we would have expected from our capstone students (well, the mutagenesis probably would’ve been some other investigation).  Here, they are doing these things as sophomores.  Similar approaches to research as a teaching tool are seen in many other BIMS courses, starting with their yeast fermentation experiments in their first semester General Biology I course.

But beyond research in regular lab courses, we also expect every student to have a capstone project involving research or internship.  Research project currently in progress include the following:

  • Studying the metagenomics of populations arising in Winogradsky columns vs. those of populations arising in Benoit columns (our Dr. Benoit has developed an alternative formulation for Winogradsky columns that uses diatomaceous earth instead of actual water source sediment as the basis for the solid phase of the column – see prior posts for more on this!).  We are determining whether the Benoit column develops similar population profiles as those arising using actual sediment.
  • Studying the presence of Coronaviruses in bat populations.  Bat guano is collected and screened using genomic tools.  Methodology began with samples recovered from museum specimens and has progressed to catching bats in the field and obtaining fresh samples.
  • Studying the genomics of moles from museums around the nation to determine the biogeography and distribution of unique populations.  Discovery of the westernmost specimens in Texas by one of our professors has led to this study to figure out which eastern population was the source so that a migration map can be constructed.
  • Recovery of antimicrobial and anti-cancer chemicals from regional plants.  Samples are obtained, studied chemically and physiologically for antibacterial properties on the McMurry campus.  Collaborations between our faculty and those at other universities (University of San Francisco, Baylor University, and University of Pennsylvania) allow more advanced chemical analysis and anti-cancer screening assays.
  • Studying the migration of crabs from coastal areas to inland lakes in Texas.  Lots of time is spent sampling regional lakes for the presence of these invasive species to determine routes and methods they use for finding new freshwater habitats.  A parallel study to this is the attempt to breed the crabs in captivity, something that has never been successfully done.

Is this it?  Is this all our students have to choose from?  Nope.  This is simply the projects currently underway.  We hope others will join our Research Teams and find their own, unique project from these and other options available at McMurry

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Our Guiding Principles – Part 2

by gwilson on Jul.16, 2012, under Program

DSCN4086Our second guiding principle is really simple:  ”Just because we can, doesn’t mean we should”.  We believe it is important to teach our students to dream big but to dream with an ethical and moral anchor.  With every big dream should come the question “Why are we doing this?”, and if we cannot answer that with something honorable and true and right, then we should consider why it should be done at all.  Let our conscience guide our decision-making, rather than checking that at the door to our laboratories!  This same ethical and moral gut-check goes for our career guidance, our course advising, and our options for capstone research.  Every car needs an accelerator to move forward and accomplish amazing things.  But it also needs a brake pedal and a steering wheel to turn that movement into productive action.

An example of how “Just because we can, doesn’t mean we should” works can be seen in some recent capstone projects.  In recent years we have implemented systems for testing environmental estrogen-like compounds, germination assays for bacterial spores, and fermentation physiology for beer production.  In each case, the project was tailored to the skills and abilities and career goals of the student.  In each case we had to scale back the scope of the project to help students find success in the limited amount of time available.  One recent group of students in Advanced Microbiology was studying resistance and germination of various mutant strains of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus.  As the students in the course brainstormed about directions this could take, we continually brought the discussion back to manageable parameters with the phrase, “Just because we can, doesn’t mean we should”.  We ended up with a limited project that could be completed in one semester and which resulted in posters for the students that were entered in (and won) an undergraduate research competition at another university.  Good research is more about depth of thought and analysis than breadth of work with shallow analysis and interpretation.

Even beyond the practical limitations for what we should do in research, we need to be teaching our students self-restraint when it comes to what is moral and ethical, keeping their efforts centered on what is honorable, true and right – and not just on what is possible.  If we don’t ingrain in our students the importance of using that filter to rein in big dreams for the sake of fostering edifying dreams, we are failing in McMurry’s mission to build a better leader for tomorrow.

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