BIMS

Tag: capstone research

Breakthrough

by gwilson on Sep.05, 2013, under Projects

DSCN2675Drs. Benoit and Wilson have long had a love affair with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) spores and their study.  Their many papers on the subject have often centered on a germination assay that follows the conversion of dormant and resistant spores back to vegetative growth.  The assay is based on watching a change in the optical density (absorbance) of spores using a spectrophotometer.  It is fast and easy and dependable.  At least it was until about 12 years ago when that assay, for some reason, stopped working.

The first indication something was wrong came in the form of an email from a researcher in New Zealand in the fall of 2001.  The graduate student was studying Bt germination and ran into difficulty replicating the results Wilson and Benoit had reported.  The email simply asked Dr. Wilson whether there were any special tricks involved in the assay.  Since neither Wilson or Benoit was involved in research due to administrative responsibilities at the time and had not experienced similar problems, they had no advice to offer.

Fast forward a few years to the creation of the BIMS program and a new graduation requirement that every student must participate in capstone research, an Honors project, or an internship.   The department needed research ideas, and Benoit and Wilson resurrected the germination assay as a means to engage students in studying new aspects of spores physiology.  The number of unique projects this system would provide for future students was enormous.   But the assay failed to work.  Even with new facilities and new resources to support research, several student projects failed to recreate results from earlier papers.  Nothing in the literature and no one in the field had an answer.

This summer, Honors student Heather Rawls became the most recent student to attempt the assay.   Through the summer she tried differences in media, growth temperature, ways of collecting and processing spores, water quality being used, activation techniques, a variety of germinants, and at least five different spectrophotometers with no predictability or consistency in the results.  If anything, fewer and fewer spores were germinating with each attempt.

In August, Heather and Dr. Wilson had a research pow wow and developed an alternate project for her Honors thesis.  Time was running out to complete her research before starting the writing, and moving to something with a higher probability for success was needed.  But Heather wasn’t ready to give up that easily.  At an impromptu meeting a couple of weeks ago, a new thought emerged when it seemed every variable possible already had been tested.  Glassware!  In their graduate programs and during their prior research using the assay, Benoit and Wilson always collected the spores in glass containers and the germinants and all other chemicals used had been stored in glass containers.  In our growing emphasis on research, McMurry had improved the funding of science programs so much that the use of disposable plastics was now the norm.  Maybe the plastic centrifuge tubes used to collect spores and store germinants were coated with something inhibiting spore germination?  Maybe some chemical was leaching out of the plastic?

Over the last two weeks, Heather switched to glassware for collecting spores and making reagents.  Her results were dramatically different.  We now are certain plasticware has an inhibitory effect on germination.  A decade of frustration was caused by our affluence and the use of disposable labware rather than old-school glass.

With a working assay, Heather will turn back to the project she intended to complete this summer looking at the germination of a variety of genetically-engineered and wildtype strains of Bacilli.  Another Honors student just beginning her work will investigate what the mystery chemical from the plastics might be and how it inhibits germination, or the range of spore-forming species affected.  One mystery is solved, more are uncovered…

BIMS Honors students prove to us on a daily basis that they are among the best thinkers and hardest workers on campus.  This commitment to uncovering the truth is what will drive them to become leaders in biomedical science and healthcare provision in the future.

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Our Guiding Principles – Part 5

by gwilson on Jul.31, 2012, under Program

malaney presentation 2I have a friend who as a graduate student invested five years into a research project in immunology.  She walked into a meeting with her dissertation committee one summer thinking it was the last briefing on her work before defending for her doctorate, and left the room with a non-thesis masters.  Something in her project had gone terribly wrong in the eyes of the committee and five years of work and promise ended up worthless in the end for an unsuspecting graduate student.  She was a determined student and started over in another program and in about four more years received her doctorate.  What a horror story!

Our fifth guiding principle is “choose projects with a high probability of success“.  We do not believe in placing students in situations where the outcome of their capstone work could leave them with nothing to show for the semester.  There are two ways we do this.  First, we do not allow students to enter into research where the results are a huge gamble – “win big or go home” is not our idea of sound research…at least not with a student’s first self-designed project conducted in their last year of college as a requirement for graduation.  For this reason, we seldom allow students to start with a blank piece of paper for their design.  Student-conceived project ideas tend to be too grandiose and risk-laden to be practical under our timeline.  Remember our other guiding principles:  ”Keep it simple, keep it short!”, and “Just because we can, doesn’t mean we should!”  So, we talk with the student and try to steer them into projects where the basic infrastructure and literature base and track record for results are clearly established on our campus.  Then we talk about what is known in the literature and what is not known, allowing the student to carve out a short, simple project that is meaningful (has unknown outcomes and thus represents real research).  So, you might say the project is student chosen from within departmental imposed parameters.

The second way we help students build a project with a high probability of success is through careful attention to experimental design.  We pride ourselves on helping students design projects that maximize results while minimizing work and time.  We want students to complete their planned experiments, conduct follow-up experiments, and produce their research paper or poster quickly.  That can only happen in this way.  So, we make sure that the first experiment (the initial planned work by the student) provides data that is unique and useful whatever the outcome. Experiments that either work or don’t work are not considered (the suggestion from that is either success or failure is the only result possible).  Instead, experiments are designed with the follow-up experiment in mind – if it turns out this way, we’ll do this…but if it turns out that way, we’ll do that.  By taking this approach, we teach students the importance of not just designing an experiment, but planning a project.

In the coming months, take a look at our webpage where the results of student capstone projects will be posted.  It is called “The Lab Report”. (http://blogs.mcm.edu/thelabreport/)

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Our Guiding Principles – Part 4

by gwilson on Jul.26, 2012, under Program

dsc04My friend Buddy used to say that “if you ask my dad what time it is, he’ll tell you how to build a clock”.  For some people the experience of storytelling involves relatively meaningless details and “fluff”, which drives those of us who just want the facts crazy.  No nonsense means more productivity.   That same philosophy is important when it comes to designing and conducting a research project.  Our fourth guiding principle is “Keep it simple, keep it short“.  We want our students to design, conduct, analyze, and report results from a research project in one or two semesters.  No chasing bunnies allowed!

Ideally, our students would join us in research projects in their sophomore year and we would work together for three years delving deeper and deeper into solving a research problem.  However, in practicality it very rarely works that way.  A huge chunk of our students are athletes or work 20+ hours weekly in addition to their courses.  Many go home for the summer to work, go on mission trips, etc.  So it is a rare student who has the opportunity and motivation to participate in uninterrupted research for three years.  For this reason, we find that our typical research student is a senior taking the capstone course.  Faculty and students must work creatively to find projects that are manageable in a finite amount of available time and require little learning curve or prolonged experiments.   For this reason, the projects often center on use of skills learned in courses already taken to address research problems with which students are somewhat familiar.  It is a blending of student interests with instructor guidance and insight to create a project that is simple and short.  We believe more is gained by short-term projects of student design than from short-term involvement of students in projects of faculty design.  After all, we are trying to train the next generation of leaders and professionals rather than the next generation of workers and technicians!  We have a choice to be average or exceptional, and we choose to make our students exceptional!

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