BIMS

Tag: diagnostic exam

Where is BIMS Going?

by gwilson on Jan.24, 2013, under Program

IMG_0363It is easy to start up a program and think the work is done.  Nothing could be further from the truth!  Good science programs are always trying new things, evaluating, gathering info from the workforce, talking to graduates now in professional schools, etc.  Good programs are on a never-ending quest for program improvement.

Where does the information come from to drive adjustments? At McMurry, all academic departments undergo annual assessment of their programs.  We are given the liberty to select what aspect of our program to evaluate in a given year.  Some programs evaluate what they are good at so they can check off the box saying they are successful.  Biology at McMurry takes a different tack.  We see assessment as an opportunity to uncover our weaknesses so we might make adjustments to strengthen our program for the benefit of future students.  In the past, this led to the creation of the BIMS degree and Life Sciences degree to complement the Biology degree.  Our approach to assessment is discovery of information to guide ongoing program improvement.

So what does Biology use to help measure program quality and success.  We use internal and external measures.  Internally, we use a diagnostic exam taken during the Junior year to see how well our lower-level courses are performing to prepare our students for upper level work.  For BIMS majors, this is accomplished in  BIMS 4000 Junior exam, a degree requirement.  The course carries no load credit, and features an online exam created in-house that can be taken as often as desired until an acceptable score is achieved.  The feedback is invaluable!  If we find an abundance of missed questions in a particular area, we know we have a course we need to work on.  We also have an internal measure of quality based on the students’ capstone research projects.  This senior project and resulting research poster are very telling in how well a student can “go deep” integrating the breadth of their coursework to guide them. Is this student ready to enter work or research or professional school with a toolkit and the experience to do more than just talk about their discipline?

We also use external measures.  Students take the ETS Major Field Test in Biology in the BIMS 4000 course.  This gives us valuable information about how our students compare with those from hundreds of other Biology programs around the nation, both in their composite scores for biology knowledge in general, and in the subscore areas appropriate to their degree program.  Our seniors also take the Collegiate Learning Assessment exam to measure growth of writing and reasoning skills over their four years of college.  Also nationally-normed, this provides additional confirmation of the quality of their education in comparison with students from across the nation in a variety of college majors.  And finally, we look at the success of our students in using their degree to further their careers – entry into a science-centered job, acceptance into a science graduate program, or acceptance into a professional school program.  Their success beyond McMurry and the feedback they provide helps us emphasize what is important and eliminated wasted effort for future students aspiring to similar careers.

How intentional is your science department in assessing its quality?

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Semester Underway

by gwilson on Jan.22, 2011, under Program

155183_470163067634_676602634_5779494_82383_nMcMurry’s spring semester is underway and classes for Biomedical Science majors continue to draw interest from students and campus leaders.  The BIMS 1300 Intro to Scientific Research course is filled beyond capacity.  Taught by Dr. Wilson, students will explore what science is, how scientists work, and how the methods of science influence all of society.  For instance, next week students will watch a video on the design firm IDEO and explore the basic science, applied science, engineering, and design that have gone into a variety of consumer products.

Dr. Benoit is teaching BIOL 1301 Unicellular Organisms to a healthy number of students.  Their semester-long project will investigate protozoans and will culminate with identification, characterization, and photomicrography of single-celled organisms.  This has proven to be a very popular and interesting class for new freshmen, and sets the stage well for a degree program filled with hands-on exploration of biomedical topics.

BIOL 3410 Microbiology is also filled to capacity and BIOL 3430 Human Physiology has a healthy enrollment.  Both are part of the sophomore sequence for all BIMS majors.  Dr. Wilson’s Micro course will feature lab projects looking at the microbial census of student cars, microbes in fresh foods, and viruses from the soil. As always, the focus is on learning knowledge and skills by jumping into research projects – students work as scientists to learn about microbiology.  Dr. Sharp’s Human Phys will use a mixture of computer sims and hands-on biometrics to explore the workings of the human body.

Also being taught this semester is BIMS 4391 Advanced Microbiology.  Dr. Wilson is leading five students on a quest to isolate and identify endospore-forming bacteria that produce antibiotics.  Students will then produce the product using new benchtop fermenters and characterize the antibiotic product physically and chemically.  The class is also considering a jaunt down to T-Bar-M ranch for the Spring Meeting of the Texas Branch of the American Society  Microbiology, which emphasizes graduate and undergraduate research.  ROAD TRIP!

Another unique feature of the BIMS program is the BIMS 4000 Junior Exam course, where students take a departmental diagnostic exam over their first two years of courses to help assess their learning to this point and to help the department assess the effectiveness of its courses in teaching fundamental information.  The five students signed up for the course may take this online exam as often as needed to achieve a passing grade.

Finally, several students are engaged in capstone research this semester with Drs. Benoit and Wilson.  They will be ramping up the YES assay for detecting estrogen-like compounds in environmental samples of water and soil.  We’ve challenged them with developing the protocols for use on campus and developing the standard curve for the assay, then begin testing on some samples from area surface and ground waters.

So, it is a busy time for a healthy program.  Bright students have chosen our unique approach to education and are thriving in the hands-on environment.

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