BIMS

Tag: guiding principles

Our Guiding Principles – Part 1

by gwilson on Jul.13, 2012, under Program

addicted to mediocritySo those who know about the BIMS program fall into two camps – those who “get it” – understand our philosophy and approach to education – and those who “don’t get it” -  can’t see how our approach can possibly create an educated and skilled graduate.  I thought I’d take some time this summer to explain our guiding principles and how they provide the context for why we do what we do and why we believe the outcome is superior to that obtained by an historic and typical college biology program.

For some perspective on how our program differs from the expected college biology degree program, we invite you to review our “About BIMS” page and the program structure found on the “Downloads” page.  You will see that our approach is skills-based, experience-laden, and “just-in-time” rather than “just-in-case” as to content.  In our archives for this page are articles written concerning the way technology has forever changed education – content, delivery, and expectations – and why we believe our approach works in concert with “the new student” rather than in opposition.  In our labs we approach teaching by engaging students in research, expecting them to apply what they learn to solve real problems.  Student and faculty engage in a master and apprentice relationship to learn and explore together.  Education should be a joint effort, not a battle of wills between student and faculty.  And so with this in mind, I’d like to explore in greater depth some of the guiding principles for how projects are selected for students to work on as they learn and prepare for a life of productive and rewarding employment.

In this first installment, we’ll look at the first guiding principle:

“Good enough isn’t good enough”.

We live in a society where some believe half the effort is “just showing up”.  We are in many ways, as Francis Schaeffer states, “addicted to mediocrity”.  Our society often equates casual familiarity with expertise, sort of like taking a tour of Europe and professing to be an expert on the area.  That mindset permeates incoming college students, who too often believe a desire to be a doctor or scientist trumps the need for hard work, specific training, and sweat equity.

BIMS is fighting that tendency by pushing our students to do more than “show up”.  We expect their very best effort to become citizens of science, to have a working knowledge and passion for learning that translates into excellence and proficiency.  To equip our students for significance in science, we can expect nothing less.  That is why our program is more than facts and dates and exposure to wetlab experience.  It is experience-laden, research-rich, content in context for the purpose of building excitement and excellence in our next generation of world-changers.

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