BIMS

Tag: quasi-research

Our Guiding Principles – Part 3

by gwilson on Jul.24, 2012, under Program

dsc02-150x150Our third guiding  principle for BIMS research projects is “Keep it Meaningful“.  There are plenty of ways to approach involving students in the enterprise of research.  One approach is to do quasi-research, projects that are original to the student but for which the outcome is known.  Repeating the work of others as a way to teach students the mechanics of designing, conducting, analyzing, and reporting a research study is a standard process used in teaching.  I’d bet everyone reading this has been in a lab at one time or another where the goal was to do an “experiment”, record the results and analyze them against the known outcome for that work.  That is a legitimate means for teaching skills, but we don’t believe that is an exposure to research.  An exercise of skills rather than an experiment to learn new knowledge.   There are plenty of courses at our school and others that take this approach.  We choose not to make this the sum total of their learning experience.

A second common approach to exposing students to research is to engage them as individual workers with their own modest component of an on-going project.  Dr. Jones is working on characterizing an enzyme’s sensitivity to chemical and environmental changes, and Student Johnny is given the task of testing divalent cations in the process.  Unlike the first approach above, this is truly research that reveals new knowledge.  However, it is science as an “assembly line” process.  Researchers in this type of compartmentalized research serve as workers doing their portion of a project with little knowledge of anything beyond their small part.  In reality, BIG science is done that way; each scientist and lab pitches in their findings to give a more complete portrait of the problem and its answers.  As with the exercise approach above, we do involve our students in projects like this in some courses (or in portions of courses).  However, we also want our students to see more than the toenail of the elephant.

We choose instead to involve our students, at some point in their BIMS experience, in designing, conducting, analyzing, and reporting on a project of their own creation.  Not an exercise repeating work previously done.  Not as a cog in a machine.  A compartmentalized project of short duration with unique and unknown outcomes.  Typically, this is their capstone project, designed in collaboration with BIMS faculty.  The benefits are huge.  Planning an experiment requires consideration of all variables rather than a pertinent subset.  It requires scheduling and preparation, background research on prior work done in the field, discipline in conducting work, discovery and repair of flaws in design, the deep thought needed to analyze and explain findings, the exacting nature of scientific writing.  Where the other approaches teach skills and how to work in an active research setting, this approach gives students the added skills of leadership and project management.  Ideal projects lead students to integrate learning from a variety of courses as they complete their work.

We believe “keeping it meaningful” means students will see the more global view of how research is designed and conducted so that no matter their future, they have the skills to face the unknown around them with confidence in their approach and toolbox for success.

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